These Walls

I was inspired by a post from a fellow blogger that made me think of the old historic Salem Church in Fredericksburg, Virginia, where intense American Civil War fighting occurred over May 3rd and 4th of 1863, during the Battle of Chancellorsville. The church was used as a hospital to attempt to help the wounded. Over 4,000 men were killed or wounded during the battle.

Here are some pictures of the church followed by my piece.

Salem Church was built in 1844. The date of this image is unknown. Image Courtesy of www.hellenicaworld.com

Salem Church was built in 1844. The date of this image is unknown.

 

A present day view of Salem Church. Image Courtesy of www.examiner.com (Penny Anderson)

A present day view of Salem Church.

The scars still remain from the intense fighting that occurred here on May 3rd and 4th of 1863. Image Courtesy of www.examiner.com (Penny Anderson)

The scars still remain from the intense fighting that occurred here on May 3rd and 4th of 1863.

If these walls could talk,

What would they say?

They keep their secrets hidden within,

A sort of mystery,

A piece of history,

That no one can hear,

No one can see,

Forever silent,

For only they to keep.

Image 1

Image 2 and Image 3

 

 

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13 thoughts on “These Walls

  1. Eerie. Reminds me of the first few chapters of Jonathan Strange and Mr.Norrell where Mr.Norrell makes the gargoyles of a beaten down church narrate all that had happened there.
    Unsettling … maybe because we sometimes want to forget the past.

    Like

    • I haven’t read that story but it does sound like it has a similar theme on the surface.

      I think people often try to forget the past but carry it with them. We can always learn from the past but it is evident that throughout human history, we rarely do as a whole, because we continually make the same mistakes throughout history.

      Like

    • I set this to post right after I went to bed and I forgot to enable it, perhaps due to being tired. Shoot. That’s disappointing on my part. I fixed it now. You are welcome to “like” the post if you still feel inclined to do so! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Living History | The Ripple's Edge

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